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  1. #1

    Default Symptoms of Psoriasis

    Although psoriasis may be almost unnoticeable in its early stages, people often report an itching and/or burning sensation as the disease progresses.

    There are many variants and types of psoriasis. But usually the course follows like this: It starts with red small bumps on the skin that progress to bigger scaly patches. The condition is associated with lot of itching. As the scales accumulate, pink to deep red plaques with a white crust of silvery scales appear on the skin surface.

    Although psoriasis may affect any area of the body, it is most commonly found on the scalp, elbows, knees, hands, feet, and genitals.

    Psoriasis has many variants. The common ones are as follows:

    - Plaque psoriasis is the most common type of the disease and is characterized by raised, thickened patches of red skin covered with silvery-white scales. Its scientific name is psoriasis vulgaris.
    - Scalp psoriasis is a common variant of Psoriasis, which is relatively more difficult to treat. Please click on the link to read an elaborate write up on scalp psoriasis.
    - Pustular psoriasis is characterized by pus-like blisters. Attacks of pustular psoriasis may be triggered by medications, infections, emotional stress, or exposure to certain chemicals. Pustular psoriasis may affect either small or large areas of the body.

  2. #2

    **ronyley** Female

    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). This STD causes herpetic sores, which are painful blisters (fluid-filled bumps) that can break open and ooze fluid. About 16 percent of people between the ages of 14 and 49 have this STD.

    Genital herpes is a contagious infection caused by a virus known as herpes simplex virus (HSV). According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, genital herpes affects about 16.2 percent of the population and approximately one in six people aged 14 to 49. Although the infection can be serious for newborn babies and people who are chronically ill, rarely is it fatal. While there is still no known cure, genital herpes does respond well to treatment.

    There are two types of herpes simplex virus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Both types are related to the family of viruses that cause chicken pox and shingles. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 can cause genital herpes. “Oral herpes” causes sores and blisters on the lips and gums and in the mouth—typically referred to as cold sores. Oral herpes is very common and can be spread by kissing or oral sex. It is usually caused by HSV-1.

    “Genital herpes” causes sores in the genital area. The sores it causes often are painful and sometimes itchy. Genital herpes can cause serious health problems in infants who become infected by their mothers during delivery and in people whose immune systems are weakened. Genital herpes can be caused by HSV-1 or HSV-2; it is most often caused by HSV-2.

    For reasons not entirely clear, many people with genital herpes either have no visible symptoms or don’t recognize the symptoms. The virus can be transmitted with or without symptoms being present. But the major concern with both oral and genital herpes is that you remain infected for life and there is no cure. When it does cause symptoms, genital herpes can produce sores in


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